Friday, January 14, 2011

News from the Twitterverse

Last night was of course my first-ever Twitterview, with Emlyn Chand.  It's a lively, dynamic way of working which unites the flexibility of the internet with the intimacy of real conversation, and I was pleasantly surprised by how much fun the whole thing was--and how much information we could exchange within the 140-character limit of Twitter.

If you missed it, then, you missed out - but fear not, because Emlyn transcribed the Q&A session.  Here's a taster:

If you want to see the rest, check out Emlyn's blog or search Twitter itself on #emlyn (for completists who want to see all the IT glitches which Emlyn has sensibly removed from the transcript!).

10 comments:

Aliya Whiteley said...

I enjoyed it. It allowed participation rather well. Maybe we MNWers on Twitter should have a think about having some sort of online conversation and then transcribing it on the blog. I mean, it would be witty and erudite, wouldn't it?

Tim Stretton said...

Wouldn't it just... ; - )

C. N. Nevets said...

It would be brilliant to read that, Aliya.

And now I can catch up on what I missed from Tim's interview yesterday...

C. N. Nevets said...

Great interview!

So, if you don't mind telling, what about DotN still grates?

Tim Stretton said...

I regretted the introduction of "gallumphers" (they made their first appearance in Dragonchaser). It would have been much more straightforward simply to represent them as horses.

In The Last Free City, I expunged them altogether, although I did introduce a new creature--the bindlespith--which I felt was much more successful.

Frances Garrood said...

Good interview, Tim. I especially liked your comment - 'sometimes by describing things in too much detail you serve only to limit the reader's experience'. That is so true. And I shall now go and find My Cousin Rachel, for if it's even better than Rebecca, it's got to be worth reading!

C. N. Nevets said...

Ah, the gallumphers. I can see where you're coming from. On the other hand, I actually loved the gallumphers because you treated them so matter-of-factly and their name seemed to embody a lot of description, personality, and functional role. I didn't love the book for the gallumphers, but they were part of what I thought was well executed, as a reader.

Tim Stretton said...

Frances, I'm in a minority in preferring My Cousin Rachel, but it's a compelling story brilliantly executed.

Nevets, I think the gallumphers just about earned their keep; they worked better in Dragonchaser which, while not exactly light-hearted, was less consciously epic in scope.

Len Tyler said...

Hi Tim, great interview. I sympathise re gallumphers. There are all sorts of things I would have changed in Herring Seller's Apprentice had I known it would be the first of a series.

Tim Stretton said...

Len, it's not a bad problem to have, is it?