Monday, January 25, 2010

Exciting News on Dragonchaser!

The Dog of the North was not the first Mondia novel I've written. Before that, there was Dragonchaser, a tale of galley racing and political intrigue which I'd always felt deserved a wider audience. Sadly commercial publishers never shared that sentiment, but soon the discerning folk of Germany may get the chance to form their own judgement.

Editions Andreas Irle, a small press specialising in the translation of Jack Vance into German, has been working on Dragonchaser in the background for a while. Andreas, an old friend and colleague from the Vance Integral Edition, has now all but finished his translation, and I've also seen a draft of the cover. For copyright reasons I can't share that yet, but it's very pleasing in its restrained elegance. Andreas has used translator's licence to retitle the book Serendip, thereby naming the book after the hero's galley rather than the villain's (or to be more accurate, one villain to another; it's that kind of book).

We are hopeful that Serendip will be on sale in late 2010 or early 2011.
Enhanced by Zemanta

13 comments:

Aliya Whiteley said...

Ahem: YAAAAAAAAAAAAAY! Reharwo! as the verification word puts it.

Frances Garrood said...

This is really great news, Tim, and the break you deserve. Congratulations! Does this mean it may come out commercially in English, too?

Neil said...

Hurrah. Congrats, Tim. That sounds great. I'll encourage any Germans I know to pre-order. ;) Seriously, great news. Well done.

Calindrill said...

A german translation of Dragonchaser?! Awesome! Andreas Irle must've fallen in love with your novel.
I even bought one of his books, it was the first german translation of Rhialto. Would've spend more money, but unfortunately the books of this publisher usually run around 50 €.

Calindrill said...

But, after a look at his site, it's obvious, that today the prices have dwindled. In former years Andreas Irle only published beautiful limited editions of Vance novels - hence the price.

Len Tyler said...

Congratulations, Tim. Brilliant news!

Elfy said...

Good news, Tim. I hope to see it in English.

Tim Stretton said...

Aliya - my thoughts exactly.

Frances - I don't think this has implications for the English language market. Editions Andreas Irle is a small, highly specialised press. Andreas is an amateur in the noblest, old-fashioned, sense of the word.

Neil - see today's post.

Calindrill - thanks. It's a real honour to be on the Andreas Irle list. His hardback Vance editions were the inspiration for the Vance Integral Edition. Dragonchaser is his favorite of my novels, and so so we arrived at a gentleman's agreement for a German translation.

Len - thanks!

Elfy - also see today's post!

Calindrill said...

Dragonchaser, which means Drachenjäger or (more freely translated) Drachenhetzer in german, is great. But I still have a very weak spot for Zael Inheritance, maybe because, for me, it feels like the most vancean of your novels.

Tim Stretton said...

Calindrill, I still like Zael too. It's a bit rough around the edges but I like the flow of the story and the chemistry of the two central characters. Very kind of you to describe any of my work as Vancean!

David Isaak said...

That is so very cool!

Some fantasy writers seem to find their core audience in Germany and Austria.

I note that the prolific and brilliant Jonathan Carroll now lives fulltime in Vienna, where he is something of a superstar--as opposed to bakc here in the States, where he is a long-term midlister.

Tim Stretton said...

David, my self-published stuff seems disproportionately popular (in a relative sense, at least) in Germany. Or maybe German readers are just more polite about sending approbatory messages to favourite authors.

Jack Vance has always been--and remains--very popular in the Netherlands.

David Isaak said...

"Jack Vance has always been--and remains--very popular in the Netherlands."

I account for that by the level of 'shroom consumption in Amsterdam. Vance definitely falls into the category of psychedelia. (I mean that as a compliment.)